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Year of the Rooster 

The Year of the Rooster starts on January 28, 2017

1921, 1933, 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2017, 2029...

People born in the Year of Rooster according to Chinese zodiac have many excellent characteristics, such as being honest, bright, communicative and ambitious. Most of them are born pretty or handsome, and prefer to dress up. In daily life, they seldom rely on others. However, they might be enthusiastic about something quickly, but soon be impassive. Thus, they need to have enough faiths and patience to insist on one thing.

Strengths
Independent, capable, warm-hearted, self-respect, quick minded
Weaknesses
Impatient, critical, eccentric, narrow-minded, selfish


2017 turns to be the Ben Ming Nian for people with Chinese zodiac sign Rooster, which means bad fortune is going to knock their doors. It would be quite hard for them to make breakthroughs in work although many efforts are given. Accordingly, the income is also not favorable on account of being affected by career, but if they make smart budget, they could make ends meet. There will be no big problem in their relationship in 2017, as their tolerance and tenderness will diminish all the bad luck. Healthwise, they are suggested to take regular physical examinations.

Chinese New Year Traditions

Goon Hei Fat Choy ! Even though the climax of the Chinese New Year, Nian, lasts only two or three days including the New Year's Eve, the New Year season extends from the mid-twelfth month of the previous year to the middle of the first month of the New Year. A month from the New Year, it is a good time for business. People will pour out their money to buy presents, decoration material, food and clothing. Transportation department, railroad in particular, is nervously waiting for the onslaught of swarms of travelers who take their days off around the New Year to rush back home for a family reunion from all parts of the country.
 

Goon Hei Fat Choy !

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Chinese Symbol of Spring

 

Days before the New Year, every family is busy giving its house a thorough cleaning, hoping to sweep away all the ill-fortune there may have been in the family to make way for the wishful in-coming good luck. People also give their doors and window-panes a new paint, usually in red color. They decorate the doors and windows with paper-cuts and couplets with the very popular theme of "happiness", "wealth", "longevity" and "satisfactory marriage with more children". Paintings of the same theme are put up in the house on top of the newly mounted wall paper. In the old days, various kinds of food are tributed at the altar of ancestors.

 

The Eve of the New Year is very carefully observed. Supper is a feast, with all members coming together. One of the most popular course is jiaozi, dumplings boiled in water. "Jiaozi" in Chinese literally mean "sleep together and have sons", a long-lost good wish for a family. After dinner, it is time for the whole family to sit up for the night while having fun playing cards or board games or watching TV programs dedicated to the occasion. Every light is supposed to be kept on the whole night. At midnight, the whole sky will be lit up by fireworks and firecrackers make everywhere seem like a war zone. People's excitement reach its zenith.

Goon Hei Fat Choy ! Very early the next morning, children greet their parents and receive their presents in terms of cash wrapped up in red paper packages from them. Then, the family start out to say greetings from door to door, first their relatives and then their neighbors. It is a great time for reconciliation. Old grudges are very easily cast away during the greetings. The air is permeated with warmth and friendliness. During and several days following the New Year's day, people are visiting each other, with a great deal of exchange of gifs. The New Year atmosphere is brought to an anti-climax fifteen days away where the Festival of Lanterns sets in. It is an occasion of lantern shows and folk dances everywhere. One typical food is the Tang Yuan, another kind of dumplings made of sweet rice rolled into balls and stuffed with either sweet or spicy fillings.

 

Goon Hei Fat Choy ! The Lantern Festival marks the end of the New Year season and afterwards life becomes daily routines once again.

Customs of observing the New Year vary from place to place, considering that China is a big country not only geographically, but also demographically and ethnically. Yet, the spirit underlying the diverse celebrations of the Chinese New Year is the same: a sincere wish of peace and happiness for the family members and friends.

      Good Luck
  • Opening windows and/or doors is considered to bring in the good luck of the new year.
     
  • Switching on the lights for the night is considered good luck to 'scare away' ghosts and spirits of misfortune that may compromise the luck and fortune of the new year.
     
  • Sweets are eaten to ensure the consumer a "sweet" year.
     
  • It is important to have the house completely clean from top to bottom before New Year's Day for good luck in the coming year. (however, as explained below, cleaning the house after New Year's Day is frowned upon)
     
  • Some believe that what happens on the first day of the new year reflects the rest of the year to come. Asians will often gamble at the beginning of the year, hoping to get luck and prosperity.
     
  • Wearing a new pair of slippers that is bought before the new year, because it means to step on the people who gossip about you.
     
  • The night before the new year, bathe yourself in pomelo leaves and some say that you will be healthy for the rest of the new year.

    Bad Luck
     
  • Buying a pair of shoes is considered bad luck amongst some Chinese. The word "shoes" is a homophone for the word for "rough" in Cantonese, or "evil" in Mandarin.
     
  • Buying a pair of pants is considered bad luck. The word "pants"(kù) is a homophone for the word for "bitter"(k?) in Cantonese. (Although some perceive it to be positive, as the word 'pants'(fu) in Cantonese is also a homophone for the word for "wealth".)
     
  • A haircut is considered bad luck. The word "hair" is a homophone for the word for "prosperity". Thus "cutting hair" could be perceived as "cutting away your prosperity" in Cantonese.
     
  • Washing your hair is also considered to be washing away one's own luck (although modern hygienic concerns take precedence over this tradition)
     
  • Sweeping the floor is usually forbidden on the first day, as it will sweep away the good fortune and luck for the new year.
     
  • Talking about death is inappropriate for the first few days of Chinese New Year, as it is considered inauspicious as well.
     
  • Buying books is bad luck because the word for "book" is a homonym to the word "lose".
     
  • Avoid clothes in black and white, as black is a symbol of bad luck, and white is a traditional funeral colour.
     
  • Avoid vulgar words. (not only restricted to New Years)

    How to Order Chinese food from a Restaurant

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